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FAQ

WHY HYDROGEN?

To generate sustainable energy worldwide, a big share of this energy needs to be generated by solar panels and wind turbines. The biggest challenges that these technologies face, is that they are intermittent energy sources. As a result, there is a need for storage.  Because of the high power density as well as the potential for long-term storage, hydrogen is an important element in the energy mix. 

IS HYDROGEN SAFE?

The use of hydrogen will be no different than the use of another energy carrier. However, any form of compact energy is of course not without risk. It is therefore important that these risks are well managed and well known. There are special standards and legislation for this, which we naturally adhere to.

IS THERE ENOUGH HYDROGEN?

A frequently heard statement is: "hydrogen is scarce, so let's use that precious resource in the place for which there is no alternative: the industry." It seems like a logical sentence but actually contains several inaccuracies.
First of all, hydrogen is not scarce at all. It is the most abundant atom in the universe. Next to this, there is also an abundance of hydrogen on Earth in another form: water. We can make as much hydrogen as we need and will never run out of it: when hydrogen is used, water is created again, and the cycle is closed. Producing hydrogen is thus a 100 % circular process. 

 

IS HYDROGEN EFFICIENT?

Hydrogen can be produced with an efficiency of 80% - and still becomes more efficient everyday - and is therefore as efficient as a standard wind turbine. A wind turbine that produces hydrogen therefore produces the same amount of energy as a wind turbine that produces electricity. When using hydrogen, an efficiency of 100 % can be achieved if it is used smartly, for example in a CHP. Since hydrogen can be stored with hardly any loss of energy, where this is not actually possible for electricity, it is expected that hydrogen will be among the top in terms of efficiency. Hydrogen can thus bring together the peaks of supply and demand, a function that is inherent in the hydrogen chain. Other energy carriers have to be built separately and therefore cost money and energy.